Essays On William Shakespeare /Sonnet 18

This section contains 824 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)

View a FREE sample

Summary: William Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 ("Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?") enhances the idea of beauty higher then that of nature, making nature's seemingly flawless beauty seem dull compared to the beauty of the beloved. Shakespeare's use of similes, metaphors, and other devices reinforces the idea of beauty living on forever through the words of his poem.


During the Renaissance period, most poets were writing love poems about their lovers/mistresses. The poets of this time often compared love to high, unrealistic, and unattainable beauty. Shakespeare, in his sonnet 18, continues the tradition of his time by comparing the speakers' love/mistress to the summer time of the year. It is during this time of the year that the flowers and the nature that surround them are at there peak for beauty. The theme of the poem is to show the speakers true interpretation of beauty. Beauties worst enemy is time and although beauty might fade it can still live on through a person's memory or words of a poem. The speaker realizes that beauty, like the subject of the poem, will remain perfect not in the eyes of the beholder but the eyes of those who read the poem. The idea of beauty living through...

(read more)

This section contains 824 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)

View a FREE sample

Essay Shakespeare's Sonnet 18

823 Words4 Pages

During the Renaissance period, most poets were writing love poems about their lovers/mistresses. The poets of this time often compared love to high, unrealistic, and unattainable beauty. Shakespeare, in his sonnet 18, continues the tradition of his time by comparing the speakers' love/mistress to the summer time of the year. It is during this time of the year that the flowers and the nature that surround them are at there peak for beauty. The theme of the poem is to show the speakers true interpretation of beauty. Beauties worst enemy is time and although beauty might fade it can still live on through a person's memory or words of a poem. The speaker realizes that beauty, like the subject of the poem, will remain perfect not in the…show more content…

Shakespeare uses two powerful metaphors in line five and in line six to compare the summer's imperfections to the perfection of the beloved. In line five he uses a metaphor "Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines" to describe that in the summer the sun gets to hot and this is yet another imperfection of a summer day which the beloved is superior to. Although some may compare there beloveds eyes with the glow or beauty of "the eye of heaven" here the speaker has chosen to claim the opposite saying that the sun is inferior to his beloved in that her eyes are more beautiful. In line six of the poem the idea of the sun being imperfect is further enhanced by phrase "gold complexion dimmed" this is implying that the sun is imperfect in that it is not always hot enough. Here the speaker implies that the beloved is flawless in that her complexion is never changed, remaining "gold" like. Nature that surrounds us is beautiful, the trees, ocean, and the wild life, and although the speaker makes a point to disfigure the view of nature the intention of the poet is to reinforce the beauty of the beloved.

In line nine "thy eternal summer shall not fade" is an allusion to the beloved staying young and beautiful for eternity. This line is referring to the season changing from summer to winter, this means that the beauty is temporary and fades over a short period of time. The beloved on the other hand is

Show More

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Essays On William Shakespeare /Sonnet 18”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *