Edld 5333 Week 1 Assignment 2015

ACCOUNTING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACC 533 <ACCT 5333> Financial Statement Analysis.
An overview of the pertinent theoretics and various applications relevant to the analysis of financial statements by applying both finance and accounting principles. Readings and case studies applied to provide a contemporary prospective. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 535 <ACCT 5302> Financial Reporting and Business Decisions.
This course involves the study and examination of financial reporting from the point of view of management, creditors, and investors. The course specifically addresses how financing, investing, and operating decisions affect financial statements. The course also covers how creditors and investors use financial statements to assess the results of managers’ decisions and the effect of alternative accounting methods on the quality of financial reporting. The course emphasizes the effect of internal accounting decisions on external financing and business decision making. The course is designed for non-Accounting majors.

ACC 564 <ACCT 5304> Accounting for Management.
This course provides an examination and application of the concepts useful to management in the analysis of accounting data for the purposes of costing and income determination, decision making and control. The course typically includes readings, cases and discussion of planning and budgeting, activity based costing, target costing, performance measurement, quality and environmental cost management. This course is designed for non-accounting majors. Prerequisites: ACC 231 and 232 or ACC 530.

ACC 568 <ACCT 5336> Government and Not-For-Profit Accounting.
This course provides an overview of financial accounting and reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Governmental accounting coverage comprises fund accounting, budgeting and control, revenue recognition in governmental funds, accounting for business-type and fiduciary activities, fund-level and government-wide financial reporting, and governmental auditing. Accounting for private not-for-profit organizations (including charitable organizations, colleges and universities, and health-care entities) covers special issues such as accounting for contributions, classifications of net assets, and industry specific reporting. Prerequisites:  Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 569 <ACCT 5347> Managerial Accounting Applications.
Study and examination of managerial accounting applications that address contemporary managerial issues and problems. Topics include activity based costing, target costing, quality costs, environmental costing, capacity costing, theory of constraints, costing for lean production, and other areas. Cases and exercises are used to provide professional practice and experience in the development and use of management accounting information for decision making and the role of the management accountant as part of the management decision making team. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

ACC 575 <ACCT 5380> Readings in Accounting.
Directed study in special topics in accounting. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

ACC 580 <ACCT 5311> Advanced Topics in Financial Reporting.
Financial accounting concepts, researching financial accounting standards, current pronouncements and application of principles to practical problems are studied. Emphasis is given to contemporary accounting literature related to current financial reporting problems. This course is designed to enhance research skills, analytical thinking skills, and written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: Admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

ACCT 5315 Seminar in Accounting Theory.
This course is a study of accounting theory, as well as a critical analysis of the history of the development of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Students will research the accounting literature, with the objective of critically evaluating the present status and future course of accounting thought. The course examines theoretical approaches to the solution of current problems in financial reporting. Prerequisite: Admission to the MS in Accounting program. Credit: 3.

ACC 582 <ACCT 5324> Information Systems Audit and Assurance.
This course provides the linkage between auditing concepts and professional standards and their application to information system principles, processing, and control. Professional practice and experience in the use of the computer as an audit tool is introduced through the use of Generalized Audit Software. This course provides students with an understanding and hands on familiarity with skills necessary to assess controls over computerized information systems and to accomplish computer assisted auditing procedures to render an opinion regarding the integrity of financial information produced by those systems. Knowledge of these concepts will help prepare the student to practice in a technologically enhanced auditing environment. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

ACC 584 <ACCT 5352> Corporate and Pass-Through Entity Taxation.
A study of the Internal Revenue Code and related tax literature associated with corporate and pass through entity taxation. Students will learn the concepts of forming, operating and liquidating C Corporations, S Corporations, LLCs and Partnerships. Federal tax returns are prepared for C Corporations, S Corporations and Partnerships. Tax research is emphasized and integrated into each of the above areas. Students will obtain proficiency in the use of various internet and paper based tax services and in the examination of related contemporary accounting literature. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 586 <ACCT 5379> Professional Ethics and Responsibility.
This course provides prospective accounting professionals an ability to apply philosophic moral theory to particular issues pertaining to the accounting profession. The course includes the examination of contemporary accounting literature related to ethical standards, ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence, and other core values. Emphasis is placed on dealing with controversial issues and examining the legal and professional responsibilities of public accountants. Topics also included are the examination of the state and AICPA Code of Professional Conduct and other governing authorities pronouncements, such as SEC, IRS, and similar such bodies. Case studies and exercises with professional responsibility and ethical considerations in “real life” situations are interspersed throughout the curriculum. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program and concurrent enrollment in ACC 599.

ACC 587 <ACCT 5355> Estate Planning, Trusts, and Nonprofits.
Concepts of estate planning to enable tax minimized transmittal of property from one generation to the next generation or beyond. Topics to include: lifetime gifts, successive life estates, use of trusts, estate tax technical issues, tax research, formation and use of family partnerships, corporations, LLCs, and other business forms in conjunction with estate planning. Understanding of charitable entities/devices and their opportunities in estate planning. Exposure to other not for profit tax entities and their return problems. Understanding and preparation of federal tax forms 709, 706, 1041, and other related forms, including Texas related forms as applicable. Understanding of community property concepts related to estate planning issues. Understanding of property issues as related to estate planning issues. Understanding and proper use of trust devices and potential tax impact (both estate and income taxation). Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 595 <ACCT 5375> ERP Business Process Integration.
This course utilizes the SAP R/3 information system paradigm as a model for examination and development of integrated business process solutions. The course examines the conceptual background, rationale, methods, and procedures commonly employed by businesses in developing and configuring integrated business systems. Cases and hands-on experience using SAP R/3 require students to configure a business process solution through integration of financial, controlling, production, materials management, sales and distribution, manufacturing, and other ERP process modules. Prerequisites: Thirty-six hours of business related courses of which twelve must be at the graduate level, completion of the MBA core courses and ACC 564 <ACCT 5304> or ACC 569, or permission of the instructor.

ACC 599 <ACCT 5399> Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice.
This course examines the theoretical and application issues of contemporary auditing as identified in the literature and by recent professional pronouncements. Topics include internal control, control risk, legal liability of auditors, audit failure, audit risk, auditor responsibility for detection of fraud, and the evolving nature of the auditing profession in compliance with new audit standards. Case studies and exercises are used to address these and other topics of importance to professional auditing practice. Prerequisite: ACC 582, graduate standing, and admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

 


 

AGRICULTURE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

AGRI 5300 <AGR 530> Advanced Fusing and Joining Metallic and Non-Metallic Materials.
Principles and techniques of bonding and fusing metallic materials by the electric and oxyacetylene processes. Study of fluxes, chemicals, and oxidants used in joining metal. Joining of non-metallic materials by mechanical and chemical means.

AGRI 5310 <AGR 531> Mechanized Harvesting and Handling of Agricultural Products.
Fundamentals of selection, service, and operation of agricultural harvesting machines. Analysis and development of mechanical systems to feed and care for livestock. Storage and handling facilities for agricultural products.

AGRI 5330 <AGR 533> Advanced Rural Utilities.
Selection and use of electrical equipment as related to efficiency and economy in agricultural production, processing and storage of feeds, forage crops and grain in connection with livestock enterprises.

AGRI 5340 <AGR 540> Advanced Animal Growth and Performance.
This course is an advanced study of physiological and endocrine factors affecting growth and performance of domestic animals.  The course includes the study of meat animal growth and developmental processes as they affect body and carcass composition, carcass quality and retail value.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.  Credit 3.

AGRI 5350 <AGR 535> Advanced Principles of Livestock Management.
Survey of current knowledge and concepts of beef production with emphasis on the stocker/feedlot segment. Includes feeding, management, marketing and disease control of stocker and feedlot cattle.

AGRI 5360 <AGR 536> Contemporary Issues in Agricultural Business.
Analysis and discussion of current issues in agricultural business with appropriate principles and theories. Issues may include marketing, management, finance, policy, international, legal and ethical topics. Student participation is expected via reports throughout the semester or term reports.

AGRI 5360 <AGR 560> Agricultural Policy.
Advanced analysis of government policies and programs important to agriculture. Topics include: the policy making process and leaders, interest groups, organization and functions of federal and state agencies, policies relevant to production agriculture and natural resources, rural development, consumer and food safety, international marketing and food distribution.

AGRI 5362 <AGR 562> Principles of Crop Protection.
Diagnosis, epidemiology, and control of plant pests. Causative and limiting factors are stressed. Designed for prospective or practicing teachers and technicians in the agro-chemical industry or in federal or state plant pest control agencies.

AGRI 5364 <AGR 564> Agricultural Internship. A directed study utilizing industry to develop an understanding of agricultural production and management principles.

AGRI 5369 <AGR 569> Special Topics in Agricultural Science.
This course will examine advanced special topics/issues and (or) subject matter in the field of Agricultural Science.  The sub-divisional fields offered are: Agriculture, Animal Science, Agricultural Business, Horticulture and Crop Science, and Agricultural Mechanization.  This course may be repeated as topics and subject matter change.

AGRI 5370 <AGR 570> Food and Fiber Crops.
A study of traditional plant breeding techniques and an overview of contemporary crop improvement methods. The physiology, adaptation, classification, taxonomy, and utilization of major crop species used for production of food and fiber are covered. Genetic and environmental influences on crop quality are discussed.

AGRI 5375 <AGR 575> Statistical Methods in Agriculture.
Applications of statistical methods for making meaningful interpretations of qualitative and quantitative data from experiments in agriculture. Instruction includes sampling and randomization, correlation and regression, analysis of variance and testing of hypotheses of means and variances, and design of experiments in agriculture.

AGRI 5382 <AGR 582> Nutritional and Physiological Inter-Relationships.
Physiological functions of various body processes in domestic animals with emphasis on the metabolic relationships among minerals, vitamins, amino acids, fats, carbohydrates, enzymes, hormones and non-nutritive feed additives and the effect of nutritional antagonists.

AGRI 5386 <AGR 586> Capital Management in Agricultural Business.
This course provides an in-depth understanding of capital marketing, capital budgeting, financial planning, and appraisal principles important in the field of agribusiness.

AGRI 5398 <AGR 598> Economics of Agricultural Production.
Agricultural production principles applied to the use of resources; cost analyses of production enterprises; linear programming of enterprises for maximizing returns; elements of depreciation schedules; evaluation for income tax purposes.

AGRI 6140 <AGR 614> Graduate Seminar.
This course is designed to provide students a forum for presentation of their graduate project and to provide an opportunity for faculty to present seminars relative to contemporary issues in agriculture. The project is an agreement between student and his/her committee. Course cannot be repeated.

AGRI 6350 <AGR 635> Techniques and Interpretation of Research.
A course designed to develop the competencies needed to interpret and utilize agricultural research. Topics will include: the philosophy of the scientific method, formats for agricultural research data, interpretation of data, and application of information to specific situations.

AGRI 6398 <AGR 698> Thesis.
In addition to the preliminary study of the techniques of research, these courses involve completion of a bibliography, organization of material, selection of a suitable problem, a digest of related literature, selection of appropriate procedures, formulation of a plan of investigating and reporting, collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis. Grade is either Credit or No Credit once completed.

AGRI 6099 <AGR 699> Thesis.
In addition to the preliminary study of the techniques of research, these courses involve completion of a bibliography, organization of material, selection of a suitable problem, a digest of related literature, selection of appropriate procedures, formulation of a plan of investigating and reporting, collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis. Variable Credit: 3 hrs, first semester; 1 hour subsequent semesters. Grade is either Credit or No Credit on completed.


 

ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ASE 510 <EDAD 5110> School Administrator Workshop.
This course deals with current topics in school administration. One semester hour is earned and the course may be repeated for a maximum of three hours. NOTE: Maximum of three hours workshop coursework allowed in a student’s program.

ASE 532 <EDAD 5332> Administration and Organization of Public Schools.
This introductory course deals with the basic activities of educational management, theories and concepts, organization, and governance of the public schools.

ASE 560 <HIED 5360> Organization and Administration of Higher Education.

ASE 561 <HIED 5361> Contemporary Issues in Higher Education.

ASE 562 <HIED 5362> Resource Development and Allocation in Higher Education.

ASE 563 <HIED 5363> Information Technology in Higher Education.

ASE 564 <HIED 5364> Leadership in Higher Education.

ASE 572 <EDAD 5372> Federal, State, and Local School Law.
The course provides a study of the legal basis of school control; the relation of the federal government to public education, the state as the fundamental legal unit in organization and administration of a state system of schools; the district as the unit of local school control; and legal duties and responsibilities of the state and local boards of education.

ASE 578 <EDAD 5378> Curriculum Planning.
This course provides a study of the various factors which influence curriculum change; the role and responsibilities of different personnel and agencies in curriculum planning; procedures in implementing curriculum change; and current programs in public school curriculum K-12.

ASE 579 <EDAD 5379> Methods of Research.
Study is made of types and methods of educational research, the collecting, analyzing and sharing of data with the public. The student is expected to complete a research project or field study utilizing appropriate methods of educational research.

ASE 586 <EDAD 5386> Special Populations and Special Programs.
Study is made of special programs offered in public schools including special and compensatory education, bilingual and ESL education, adult and continuing education, and vocational and technical education.

ASE 587 <EDAD 5387> Workshop in Education.
The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered. Note: Maximum of six hours of coursework allowed in a student’s program.

ASE 610 <EDAD 6110> Workshop in Educational Leadership.
This course deals with current topics in educational leadership. The topics selected for the workshop will be based on needs identified through collaborative endeavors with schools, service centers, professional organizations and governmental agencies. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three hours. NOTE: Maximum of three hours workshop coursework allowed in a student’s program.

ASE 660 <EDAD 6360> Psychology of Learning.
Study is made of the principles of psychology as they apply to learning and teaching. Pertinent research is studied in an attempt to find ways to make instruction more effective.

ASE 662 <EDAD 6362> Campus Leadership (Internship).
This laboratory course is designed to provide intensive study and field experience in problems relating to a specific job at the elementary, middle or senior high school level. Last course to be taken in the sequence of courses. May be taken with one to two other courses.

ASE 668 <EDAD 6368> Instructional Leadership I.
The course focuses on leadership for the improvement of instruction and includes current research on school and teaching effectiveness.

ASE 670 <EDAD 6370> Campus Business Management.
This course provides candidates with the skills to understand basic campus accounting and budgetary functions as well as the management of the school facility/plant. This course deals with basic concepts of management of campus activity funds, personnel accounting, instructional budgetary functions, translating student academic needs into the budget, public finance; and problems in local, state, and federal support of education.

ASE 671 <EDAD 6371> Role of the Principal in School Administration.
This course is designed for school administrators and supervisors. Consideration is given to organization, program curriculum, plant supervision, and evaluation for the principal functioning at the elementary, middle or senior high school level. Prerequisite: ASE 532 <EDAD 5332> and ASE 668.

ASE 672 <HIED 6372> Practicum in Instructional Leadership.
This course provides a field practicum for students seeking a position as an instructional supervisor. It is designed to provide intensive study of the field of instructional leadership. Last course to be taken in the sequence of courses. May be taken with one to two other courses.

ASE 675 <EDAD 6375> Women in Educational Leadership.
This course addresses issues and challenges of particular interest to women in educational leadership positions. It is designed to encourage prospective women administrators by enhancing leadership, interpersonal and motivational skills.

ASE 678 <EDAD 6378> Building Capacities for Teaching and Learning.
This course addresses the development of effective leadership strategies to improve student achievement through curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development.

ASE 679 <EDAD 6379> Program Evaluation for School Improvement.
This course provides candidates with the skills to develop an understanding of the program evaluation process for overall school improvement and become critical consumers of research to guide decision-making; access resources, databases, and best practice models to inform effective leadership; and effectively use student assessment data to promote academic achievement and intervention programs.

ASE 680 <EDAD 6380> Executive Leadership for Superintendents.
This course provides candidates with the skills to assume the role of the contemporary superintendent or head of schools. This course consists of topics, content, and independent inquiry that address the specific and unique leadership needs of districts.

ASE 681 <EDAD 6381> District Business and Financial Management.
This course provides candidates with the skills to understand basic district accounting and budgetary functions as well as the management of district facilities. This course deals with basic concepts of management of campus activity funds, personnel accounting, instructional budgetary functions, translating student academic needs into the budget, public finance; problems in local, state, and federal support of education, state financial systems, with emphasis on Texas; local taxation; budgeting; financing capital items; and fiscal management.

ASE 682 <EDAD 6382> Human Resource Management.
Study is made of the administrator’s role in recruiting and retaining adequate staff. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, and academic freedom are considered. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Principalship core coursework.

ASE 683 <EDAD 6383> Practicum for Superintendents I.
The course provides a study of the duties and responsibilities of the school administrator as related to public relations, personnel administration, instructional leadership, financial management and school plant planning. Last course to be taken in the sequence of courses. May be taken with one to two other courses.

ASE 684 <EDAD 6384> Practicum for Superintendents II.
This course provides specific opportunities, independent inquiry, and experiences that are necessary for the dispositional and affective elements of the superintendency as candidates learn to manage organizational behavior and district performance.

ASE 685 <EDAD 6385> Culturally Proficient Leadership.
In this course leadership candidates will develop an understanding of how organizational culture and climate intersects with diverse subcultures in the school and school community. Candidates will reflect on their own cultural biases and collect data on school culture, climate, and community to develop action plans that address need areas. Candidates will explore the application of organizational, communication, multicultural, and cultural proficiency theories and models to day-to-day practice.

ASE 687 <EDAD 6387> Field Studies in Educational Administration.
This course provides candidates an opportunity to engage in a detailed field study under the direction of graduate faculty. The topic and area of study must be approved by the supervising faculty member.

ASE 690 <EDAD 6390> The School Plant.
The course is designed for school superintendents, business managers, and other school personnel whose responsibilities include school plant planning and management. Topics considered include how to use and maintain present school plants, keeping the school board and community informed as to building needs, selecting architects, and financing construction, and the developing educational specifications.

ASE 694 <EDAD 6394> Instructional Leadership II.
This course is designed to certify individuals as having completed Instructional Leadership Development. Emphasis is also placed on the improvement of instruction through research findings and demonstration of instructional improvement in various curricular offerings.

ASE 696 <EDAD 6396> Appraisal and Development of Educational Personnel.
This course is designed to prepare individuals to assess the effectiveness of instruction. Emphasis is also placed on evaluation techniques, conferencing with teachers and development of professional growth plans.

ASE 697 <EDAD 6397> Current Issues for School Administrators.
This course will provide practicing and prospective school administrators an opportunity to become current with state and national education issues. These issues will include school finance, school law, special programs, leadership and management, instructional issues, evaluation of programs and personnel, and changing policies at the state and national level.

 


 

BUSINESS ANALYSIS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BAN 530 <BANA 5300> Quantitative Tools for Business.
An introduction to a variety of quantitative tools used in the business sector. Emphasis will be placed on statistical analyses and operations. Topics include descriptive statistics, normal distribution theory, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear programming, forecasting, inventory management, JIT, productivity, competitiveness & strategy, aggregate planning, and facilities layout. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program or the MS in Finance degree.

BAN 568 <BANA 5368> Techniques of Statistical Analysis.
An integration of the concepts and application of statistical and quantitative techniques currently used in business decision making. Readings in the current literature related to statistical inference, ANOVA, correlation, simple linear regression, multiple regression, questionnaire construction and analysis will be covered.

BAN 575 <BANA 5380> Readings in Business Analysis.
A directed study for individual students who wish intensive work in a special topic area of business analysis. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.


 

BIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BIOL 5200 <BIO 520> Professional Aspects of Science.
An essential course on scientific professionalism for the beginning M.S. student. This course provides students with an introduction to the professional and ethical responsibilities of scientists. Students will also discuss philosophical and controversial issues in academia and science, as well as political issues that may influence the process and practice of science. Most importantly, this course encourages and helps students to develop skills needed for presenting their research to fellow scientists through the processes of publishing, giving conference presentations, writing grant proposals, and becoming active in the scientific community. Required of all graduate students in Biology. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Credit 2.

BIOL 5305 BIO 530 Forensic Entomology.
The methods and materials necessary for use of insects as forensic evidence in legal investigation will be discussed. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: introductory entomology and graduate standing. Credit 3.

BIOL 5310 BIO 531 Classification and Natural History of Plants.
Classification and natural history of major groups of nonvascular and vascular plants are presented. Emphasis is on morphological recognition, ecological and physiological differences and economic importance of major taxa. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: Introductory Botany course and graduate standing. Credit 3.

BIOL5320 Statistical Design and Analyses in Biology

This course surveys various experimental designs and associated statistical analyses common in biology.   Using primarily the general linear model, we will explore in detail appropriate designs for the following statistical applications: independent t-test, Analysis of Variance, block, multivariate, paired t-test, repeated measures, correlation, regression, Analysis of Covariance, ordination, clustering, randomization, and goodness of fit.  The class will consist of lecture, practical exercises in analyzing data (using SAS, SPSS, or another comparable analytical program), and class discussion of experimental designs published in the primary literature.   This course is meant to be a follow up to Biostatistics (BIOL4374) in that the basic statistical theory will not be presented.  Rather, this course will focus on the practical use of experimental design for analyzing and interpretation data.   Grading in this class will be based on exams and individual practical exercises. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Department of Biological Sciences and Biostatistics BIOL4374 (or equivalent), or special permission by instructor. Credit 3

BIOL 5340 <BIO 534> Electron Microscopy.
This course is designed to teach students the methods of preparing specimens for electron microscope analysis and to use the electron microscope as a tool to conduct research. Students will become competent in using the electron microscope for visual analysis or chemical elemental analysis. Prerequisites: 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5350 <BIO 535> Plant Evolutionary Biology.
The developmental program of many plants is sufficiently plastic to allow a suite of evolutionary scenarios not encountered in other major lineages. Mechanisms such as hybridization, polyploidy, somaclonal variation, chromosomal rearrangement, and the evolution of diverse and unique breeding systems have allowed plants to thrive in every terrestrial biome.  Additionally, many of these mechanisms allow for rapid evolution that can be documented over the span of a few generations.  This course will cover the myriad ways in which plants have diversified from their endosymbiotic ancestors as well as the hallmarks of evolution that characterize major plant  lineages.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Department of Biological Sciences and an introductory course in botany. Credit 3.

BIO 5360 <BIO 536> Principles of Systematics.
Systematics is the study of biological diversity, encompassing the evolutionary origins of this diversity and the construction of classification systems that recognize evolutionary lineages.  This course will cover the history and philosophy of classification as a whole, from the development of nomenclature to modern techniques of molecular phylogenetics.  Topics will include species concepts, nomenclature, interpreting and inferring phylogenies from many kinds of data, the use of DNA databases, DNA barcoding and alternatives to the Linnaean system of nomenclature.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing and an introductory course in statistics. Credit 3.

BIO 5362 <BIO 562> Advanced Plant Physiology.
Further studies of the life processes of plants at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels with focus on current research and recent advances in this field. A scholarly paper on a selected physiological topic is required. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIO 5480 <BIO 548> Comparative Animal Physiology.
A study of the physiological adaptive mechanisms and the comparison of adaptive strategies across vertebrate taxa. Emphasis will be directed toward homeostatic mechanisms of water, energy and electrolyte balance, and metabolism. A two-hour laboratory to emphasize investigative skills employing modern laboratory techniques is included. Independent original research project required. Prerequisites: organic chemistry, general physiology, or instructor's consent. Credit 4.

BIOL 5364 <BIO 564>Cell Structure and Physiology.
A study of signal transduction pathways in the cell. For the laboratory portion of the course, students will conduct independent investigations of cells defective in signal transduction and prepare a scientific paper of the results. Prerequisites: cell biology and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 5368 <BIO 568> Advanced Invertebrate Zoology.
Invertebrates are the dominant form of life on earth, comprising greater than 75% of all described species. Students will be briefly introduced to the phylum/class level characteristics of the major groups of invertebrate animals. The majority of the course will deal with the evolutionary history and phylogeny of invertebrates, invertebrate ecology, and the myriad solutions invertebrates have evolved to deal with the common problems of reproduction, feeding, osmoregulation, respiration, locomotion and developmental patterns. Prerequisites: 12 hours advanced biology, invertebrate zoology recommended. Credit 3.

BIOL 5371 <BIO 571> Evolution.
This course is concerned with modern concepts of the evolution of organisms. Extended reading and classroom discussion supplement the lecture treatment. Three one-hour lectures a week are scheduled. Prerequisite: introductory genetics. Credit 3.

BIOL 5375 <BIO 575>Bacterial Physiology.
A study of bacterial metabolism that will include fermentation, anaerobic respiration, bacterial photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. This course will also discuss how bacteria sense their environment and adjust their metabolism accordingly. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: microbiology, genetics, and organic chemistry II or general physiology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5378 <BIO 578> Virology.
A study of viruses that infect plants, animals, and bacteria. Areas considered include chemical and structural properties of viruses, virus-host relations, and infection and growth phenomena, including interference and regulation. Also included are the roles of viruses as agents of disease and malignancy, and as gene vectors in natural settings, but also as tools in biotechnology and gene therapy. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: microbiology, genetics, and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 5380 <BIO 580> Advanced Ecology.
An advanced theoretical and practical study of biotic and abiotic ecosystem interactions encompassing the physiology of individuals, growth of populations including social and species interactions within populations, analysis of population composition and change, the distribution of communities, and the functioning of ecosystems. Independent study of a selected ecological topic required. Prerequisites: general chemistry I and II, general ecology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5381 <BIO 581>Ecological Computer Modeling.
An introduction to the development and application of computer models in ecology and population biology. Principles of modeling, programming concepts, specific model dynamics, and prepackaged computer models will be explored. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: general ecology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5382 <BIO 582> Ichthyology.
Ichthyology will introduce general concepts in biology, taxonomy, systematics, evolution, zoogeography and ecology of fishes.   Students will learn the characteristics and identifying features for most of the dominant fish families on Earth.  Moreover, students will leave with a working knowledge on the taxonomy and nomenclature of the marine and freshwater fishes of Texas as well as the skills necessary to identify fishes from across the globe. This class includes a 2-hour weekly laboratory and field work.   Credit 3.

BIOL 5383 <BIO 583>Herpetology.
An introduction to the biology of amphibians and reptiles and one of the most important evolutionary events in natural history: the rise and diversification of terrestrial vertebrates. A comprehensive introduction will address the taxonomy, systematics, evolution, anatomy, physiology, ecology, distribution, and natural history of these unique vertebrates. Upon completion of this course, students will understand and appreciate why amphibians and reptiles serve as excellent biological models in research, and will become familiar with the major research questions and programs in herpetology. A laboratory and field component will introduce students to a variety of sampling and collecting techniques. Common museum practices for specimen preservation and documentation will also be addressed. Although regional species will receive the most emphasis, this course will address the biology of all amphibians and reptiles. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: introductory biology plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5384 <BIO 584> Ornithology.
The classification evolution, anatomy, physiology, ecology, behavior and conservation of birds are studied in this course. Laboratories include general anatomy, taxonomy, identification and field techniques used in the study of behavior and migration. Laboratories may include independent research projects related to topics discussed in this course. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: introductory biology plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5385 <BIO 585> Mammalogy.
The taxonomy, systematics, anatomy, ecology, distribution, and life history of mammals are studied in this course. Laboratories include general taxonomy, identification, and field techniques. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: introductory biology plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5390 <BIO 590> Limnology.
This class examines physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of freshwater stream and lake ecosystems.  Limnological techniques are stressed with special emphasis on physiochemical conditions of freshwater environments and their effects on aquatic life. Plankton analysis, a study of bottom fauna, lake and stream mapping and evaluation of aquatic productivity are included. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: 8 hours college chemistry plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5391 <BIO 591> Advanced Genetics.
This is an advanced study of the principles of heredity and the nature and function of the gene. Emphasis will be on molecular genetics with special attention to recent advances in DNA technologies. Laboratory studies include completion of a mini-research project and preparation of a scientific paper. Two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: introductory genetics with grade of C or better and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 5394 <BIO 594> Special Topics in Graduate Biology.
This course of Graduate Faculty-led study is designed to provide exposure of graduate students to new biological topics and concepts in a course setting, prior to that course's formal Department, College, and University course adoption. This course may be repeated for different Advanced Special Topics (different courses). Prerequisite: graduate standing in the Department of Biological Sciences or consent of the instructor.

BIOL 5095 <BIO 595> Special Graduate Topics in Biology.
This course is designed to provide an avenue for selected graduate students to engage in independent studies. Registration is on an individual basis but is limited to students in residence. A topic of study is selected and approved by the Biology faculty. Prerequisites: graduate standing in Biology and consent of department chair. Credit 3.

BIOL 5386 <BIO 596> Reproductive Physiology.
Physiological control of animal reproduction is the subject of this course. Current literature relating to this subject is critically examined and evaluated. An individual research problem is undertaken by the student. Two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: introductory courses in physiology and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 6398 <BIO 698> Thesis.Credit 3.

BIOL 6099 <BIO 698> Thesis. Variable Credit 1 to 3.

 


 

BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BSL 565 <BESL 5301> Applied Linguistics for Classroom Teachers.
This course relates to the language sciences as they apply to formal and informal instruction. Language situations, descriptions, criteria, population, variations, and linguistic pressures are investigated. The nature of language, language teaching, language theory, and learning theory are examined in an attempt to provide a sound second language pedagogy.

BSL 571 <BESL 5302> Social, Cultural, and Language Influences on Learning.
This course is an integration of concepts fundamental to meeting the needs of students with diverse backgrounds. This course looks at language in its social and cultural contexts. It provides strategies to address the needs of second language learners from varied linguistic backgrounds. It examines sociocultural factors in the language classroom, interpersonal relations, concepts, models, and strategies for pluralistic teaching.

BSL 574 <BESL 5303> Teaching English as A Second Language: Oral Language Communication.
This course emphasizes the nature of language; the structure of language, the nature of first and second language acquisition; possible areas of interference; student motivation; trends in effective teaching materials and procedures; observation, testing and evaluation techniques; and the significance of culture.

BSL 575 <BESL 5380> Teaching the Language Arts and Reading in Spanish.
Emphasis is placed on the rationale, techniques, approaches, culture, activities, and methods of teaching reading in Spanish in the elementary bilingual classroom.

BSL 576 <BESL 6301> Bilingual Program Development in the Content Areas.
This course is designed to address basic teaching principles in the areas of science, mathematics, and social studies; the organization and structure of bilingual programs; guidelines for language usage; staffing, scheduling, and physical organization; and learning styles, teaching strategies and use of auxiliary personnel specific to the bilingual classroom.

BSL 577 <BESL 5304> Language Acquisition and Development for Bilingual and ESL Programs.
This course examines theories of second language acquisition as well as relationship between second language acquisition theory and language teaching. It compares and contrasts different theoretical perspectives of language, the learner, and the language learning process. It explores current research in the field of second language acquisition.

BSL 587 <BESL 6320> Workshop in Education: Bilingual Education.
The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.

 


 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CI 533 <CIED 5333> Roles and Responsibilities of the Professional Educator.
This course is designed to assist teachers in understanding the structure, organization and management of public schools.  This will include school history, law, diversity, and special population. Prerequisites: CI 560 <CIED 5360> and CI 593 <CIED 5393> or SSED 383 and SED 464. Credit 3.

CI 560 <CIED 5360> Advanced Techniques and Methods of Instruction.
Study is made of current teaching techniques, strategies, and materials. Students will identify, research and develop approaches to problems pertaining to their teaching field. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CI 563 <CIED 5363> The Role of the Technology Liaison.

CI 565 <CIED 5365> Technology and Cognition.
The purpose of Technology and Cognition is to incorporate technology into teaching and learning in relation to the brain development in school-age children, emphasizing instructional techniques for enhancing learners' cognitive development through the use of technology. Students will design advanced technological applications for instruction, based upon best practices in technology and cognition. Prerequisite:  Graduate Standing.

CI 567 <CIED 5367> Readings and Trends in Instructional Technology.
This course acquaints students with the critical writings and ideas of prominent practitioners, researchers, and theorists in instructional technology with a focus on understanding the trends and issues pertaining to a scholarly study of integrating technology into instruction. Students will read and provide reflections regarding the best instructional technology strategies evident in the literature and in practice in PK-12 schools.

CI 569 <CIED 5369> Practicum for Technology Facilitation.
This course provides a field-based practicum in a school setting. Examination is made of the duties and responsibilities of the technology facilitator on a daily basis. Prerequisite: CI 567 <CIED 5367> , CS 583, CS 585, CS 587, and CS 589.

CI 570 <CIED 5370> Research in Teaching.
This course is designed for classroom teachers of all subject and grade levels. The focus of this course is to prepare teachers to read published research critically, to integrate those finding with personal experience in order to make reflective instructional decision and to participate in pedagogical research, theory-building, and elementary statistics. (Taught Fall Semester) Prerequisite: CI 583 <CIED 5383> and CI 584 <CIED 5384> .

CI 583 <CIED 5383> Integrating Current Technologies in Teaching.
Laboratory experiences are provided for graduate students in integrating technology into the curriculum. This course is recommended for both Education and non-Education majors.

CI 584 <CIED 5384> Curriculum Trends for Classroom Teachers.
Development of the public school curriculum and significant factors which help to determine the curriculum construction are studied. Opportunity to select and organize appropriate learning experiences for the different levels is offered.

CI 585 <CIED 5085> Current Issues in Education.
Analysis of opposing or varying viewpoints on educational issues of current concern is the main focus of the course. Examination of research literature, current data, experts in the various fields, and utilization of current technology in the examination of contemporary topics will be completed. Prerequisite: CI 570 <CIED 5370> (Taught Spring Semester).

CI 587 <CIED 5387> Workshop in Education.
This course is designed to explore the relation of brain development in school-age children and methods for enhancing this development through the use of technology. Students will have the opportunity to design instructional aides, which seamlessly implement developmentally appropriate technology in the classroom.

CI 590 <CIED 5390> Advanced Methods in Classroom Management and Discipline.
This course is designed for K-12 teachers of all subject areas. Increased proficiency in classroom management skills is the primary objective of the course. Teachers will be provided with an understanding of the factors influencing individual and group behavior in school settings; methods of diagnosing school and classroom factors that may be eliciting the problem; and the options available for influencing student behaviors. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CI 593 <CIED 5393> Assessment of Learning.
The focus of this course is research in current literature on strategies for the analysis of student work designed to improve instruction and student success. Students will develop skills in the use of a wide range of assessment strategies. Prerequisite: CI 560 <CIED 5360> and CI 597 <CIED 5397> or SED 374 and SED 494

CI 597 <CIED 5397> Human Growth and Development Across the Lifespan.
This course is designed to relate theory and research to present concerns and problems of teachers through the study of physiological psychological and social interrelationships. Advanced content in brain research as it effects learning and impacts instruction will be emphasized.

CI 598 <CIED 5398> Internship in Classroom Instruction.
This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines. Prerequisite: CI 593 <CIED 5393> or SED 383 and SED 464.

CI 599 <CIED 5399> Internship in Classroom Instruction.
This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines. Prerequisite: CI 593 <CIED 5393> or SED 383.

CIED 6394 Developing Curriculum for Adults.
This course provides knowledge and skills in curriculum development for adult learners. Candidates will analyze conceptual models of curriculum theory, curriculum development, and curriculum research. Topics in this course include: contextual factors affecting curricular design for adults, curriculum planning, implementation, and outcomes evaluation. Prerequisite: CIED 5397. Credit 3.

CI 731 <CIED 7331>Teaching Strategies for Developmental Mathematics.
This course explores research and practical application of mathematical concepts related to developmental mathematics education. Principals of learning, students' mathematical strategy development, assessment/evaluation of teaching/learning, and the use of instructional technology will be examined using research-based best practices in developmental mathematics education. Credit 3.


 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CJ 530 <CRIJ 5330> Critical Analysis of Justice Administration.
An analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States; role of justice agencies as part of societal response to crime; the knowledge base of criminal justice; issues, problems, trends.

CJ 531 Techniques for Crime Scene Investigation.
Course provides advanced study in the application of new techniques in crime scene investigation. The concept of physical evidence and quality assurance procedures in forensic analysis will be included.

CJ 532 <CRIJ 5332> Perspectives in Criminology.
Survey of the field of criminology emphasizing perspectives regarding the making of law, breaking of law and societal reactions to the breaking of law.

CJ 534 <CRIJ 5334> Courts As Organizations.
Critical evaluation of the dispensing of justice in America, using the systems theory approach, as well as current court policy.

CJ 535 <CRIJ 5335> Security and the Future.
Course will focus on meeting the changing demands of security in a global environment. Discussion emphasizing the understanding of how to design, implement, and integrate the security function in an every-changing world and the impact of major economic, demographic, and technological trends on developing strategies for security innovation and growth.

CJ 536 <CRIJ 5336> Legal Aspects and Private Security.
Focus will be on how the law impacts security in many diverse ways. Discussion will emphasize the concept of criminal intent; early criminal law and the emergence of law enforcement and private security; the legal difference between public policing and private security; and an overview of legal terms and issues with which the security manager must address.

CJ 537 Law and Forensic Sciences.
Focus will be on how the law impacts forensic science.

CJ 538 <CRIJ 5338> Security and Management.
Focus is on managing the security organization and its human resources; discussion and on results-oriented security management, the basic foundations of security, the importance of technology, and specialized security applications will be addressed.

CJ 539 <CRIJ 5339> Global Terrorism.
Course will focus on philosophies, tactics, and targets of terrorist groups; discussion of emerging terrorism trends and the roles of the private sector and U.S. Government in responding to and preventing terrorism. Students will also gain insight on how terrorism influences U.S. Foreign Policy.

CJ 560 Forensic Analysis of Pattern Evidence.
Course will introduce the concepts, theories and principles used in forensic analysis of material and pattern evidence. Recent developments in the techniques applied in forensic or material and pattern evidence will be discussed.

CJ 561 Principles of Quality Assurance in Forensic Science.
Course will introduce the concepts and procedures associated with quality assurance.

CJ 562 Seminar in Forensic Science.
Course will focus on the various subdisciplines in the forensic sciences. Recent developments and changes in these subdisciplines will be discussed.

CJ 563 <CRIJ 5363> The Juvenile Offender.
Theoretical perspectives regarding the creation of childhood as a social construct and the etiology of juvenile offending. Particular attention is paid to the role of family, peers and school.

CJ 572 <CRIJ 5372> Community Based Corrections.
Techniques and procedures utilized in the supervision of adult and juvenile probationers and parolees, and other residents of community-based corrections facilities. Preparation of social history, pre-hearing, and pre-sentence investigation reports. Emphasis on practical problems confronting the probation and parole and other community-based corrections officer.

CJ 592 <CRIJ 5392> Survey of Research Methods.
The theory and application of social science research techniques and designs, with a focus on the interpretation and use of research findings. Students who have not completed an introductory course in research methods within the past five years must take CJ 478 as a prerequisite.

CJ 593 <CRIJ 5393> Legal Aspects of the Criminal Justice System.
Aspects of law which are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes.

CJ 594 <CRIJ 5394> Legal Research.
Methods and techniques of research in the legal system. Designed to prepare students to locate, interpret and disseminate relevant statutory and case law as well as scholarly legal works.

CJ 615 Criminal Justice Statistics Lab.
One hour (one semester credit hour) computer lab which must be taken in conjunction with CJ 685 <CRIJ 6385> (Statistics for Criminal Justice Research).

CJ 632 <CRIJ 6332> Resource Development in the Organizational Context.
Critical issues and strategic questions regarding managing human resources in criminal justice agencies. Policy areas discussed are: (1) employee influence; (2) human resource flow; (3) reward systems; and (4) work systems. Human resource management as a coherent, proactive management model.

CJ 633 <CRIJ 6333> Seminar in Organization and Administration.
The study of bureaucracy and complex organizations with strong emphasis on the concepts and practices of the organization and management of public agencies in the United States. Special consideration is given to the various philosophies, typologies, and models of administrative systems in criminal justice.

CJ 634 <CRIJ 6334> Research Methods and Quantitative Analysis in Criminal Justice.
Methods and techniques of research and research design; conducting and assessing research in the criminal justice agency management environment; translation of research findings to policy; informational resources readily available to the agency manager. Designed to prepare students to gather decision-relevant information.

CJ 635 <CRIJ 6335> Seminar in Leadership and Management.
Problems and alternative solutions in criminal justice management. The case study method and current readings provide an admixture of practical and educational experiences intended to foster and disseminate new ideas for management strategies, especially as this is impacted by leadership styles, human resources, and the environment.

CJ 636 <CRIJ 6336> Computer/Technology Applications for Criminal Justice.

 

EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability 

Rubric

Use the following rubric to guide your work.

TasksAccomplishedProficientNeedsImprovementUnacceptableWeek 2 Assignment: Mining for Data (ELCC 2.2 a., b., c.; 2.3 a., c.)Part 1:CampusReportSummary

Conductsdetailedcomparison of scores in eachsubject,subgroup, andgrade level tothe standardsfor Acceptable,Recognized,and Exemplary.

(10 points)

Comparesscores in eachsubject,subgroup, andgrade level tothe standardsfor Acceptable,Recognized,and Exemplary.

(8 points)

Does notcomparescores in eachsubject,subgroup, andgrade level tothe standardsfor Acceptable,Recognized,and Exemplary.

(7 points)

Does notsummarizeCampusReport.

(0 points)Part 2:CampusGroup and CIReportSummary

Conductsdetailedcomparison of scores in eachsubject to thestandards forAcceptable,Recognized,and Exemplary.

(10 points)

Comparesscores in eachsubject,subgroup, andgrade level tothe standardsfor Acceptable,Recognized,and Exemplary.

(8 points)

Does notcomparescores in eachsubject,subgroup, andgrade level tothe standardsfor Acceptable,Recognized,and Exemplary.

(7 points)

Does not turnin this portionof assignment.

(0 points)Part 3: Multi- Year HistoryReportSummary

Successfullynotes trendsand/or patternsin campus AEISdata.

(10 points)

Notes onetrend and/orpattern incampus AEISdata.

(8 points)

Does not notetrends and/orpatterns incampus AEISdata.

(7 points)

Does not turnin this portionof assignment.

(0 points)Part 4: AEISChartCompletion

Completes allapplicable datain three AEISComparisonCharts.

(10 points)

Completes allapplicable datain two AEISComparisonCharts.

(8 points)

Completes allapplicable datain one AEISComparisonChart.

(7 points)

Does not turnin this portionof assignment.

(0 points)Part 5: Areaof Strength

Identifies onearea of campusIdentifies onearea of campusIdentifies onearea of campusDoes not turnin this portion

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